Jonathan Sterne at Sounding Out!

by justindburton on June 4, 2012

At Sounding Out!, the best sound studies blog on the internet, Jonathan Sterne ruminates on the recent manifs casseroles in Montreal and Quebec.

Every night around 8pm, in neighborhoods across Montreal and Quebec, you can hear the din of clanging pots and pans in manifs casseroles (manif is short for manifestation en cours, a street protest).  About a block from our home in Montreal’s Villeray neighborhood, at the intersection of Jarry and St-Denis—one of the major epicenters—our local manif begins with people crossing in the crosswalks, banging loudly and rhythmically.  We see neighbors and people from local businesses,  families with small children, elderly and retired people, working adults, and many students.

Sometimes a manif casserole sounds like random banging, but most I’ve experienced leave sheer raucous pounding for moments when one march meets up with another, or when someone on a balcony does something particularly cool to cheer on the marchers.  A rhythm usually arises from the chaos, encircling the disorder and enveloping everyone.  Sometimes the rhythms connect with chants like “la loi spéciale, on s’en câlisse,” which roughly translates to “we don’t give a fuck about your special law.”

Eventually, the numbers grow, and then all of a sudden, as if by magic or intuition, we stand in the middle of the intersection, blocking traffic.  The police have taken to simply routing traffic away from the protest.  Eventually, we march south on St-Denis toward other neighborhoods (the exact route varies), often swelling into a giant parade of thousands, or as E.P. Thompson might suggest, a parody of a formal state procession, announcing the “total publicity of disgrace” for its subject. (“Rough Music Reconsidered,” 6,8).

The numbers are part of the politics.  For the last 100-odd days most Quebec students have been on strike against tuition increases of over 70% in five years.  Some protests have numbered in the hundreds of thousands. The Quebec government tried to suppress the student movement by passing Bill 78 on May 18, 2012.  Among its many preposterous provisions, any spontaneous gathering of over 50 people is illegal without prior police approval—even a picnic.  Protesters not only must disclose their planned route, but also their means of transportation, According to Law 78, people are criminals the minute they join a protest, which is why so many people have taken to the streets.

Here’s a link to the full post.

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